HOW IS YOUR LICENCE APPLICATION EVALUATED?

Water is scarce in South Africa, and in many places the demands for water are greater than the amount of water we have to allocate. We must, therefore, make sure that our limited water resource is not only shared out fairly, but also that the use of water realizes the bests benefits for nation as a whole.

This means that we cannot just give water to everyone who applies, but must carefully balance the impacts the use of water will have on aquatic ecosystems, other existing lawful water users, as well as potential future users – with the benefits the use of water has for the nation. These benefits can be measured in the contribution the use of the water will make to the economy, job creation and in helping government reach its key goals. This includes an assessment of the contribution the use of the water makes to race and gender reform in water use.

The Department has developed a screening tool, which helps balance the possible impacts of the water use with the likely benefits that may accrue from the use of the water. Generally, applications for water use that has little impact, but big benefits could be processed quickly with scooping level impact assessments. However, applications for water use that may have big impacts, and little benefits would have to be carefully considered before an answer can be given. In these cases the Department may require you to do a detailed impact study.

Click here to use the screening tool for abstraction (i.e. taking water from rivers, dams or the groundwater) that the Department may use to evaluate your application.

REMEMBER THAT THIS IS NOT USED TO APPROVE OR TURN DOWN A LICENCE, IT IS ONLY USED TO HELP PROCESS YOUR LICENCE.

REMEMBER ALSO THAT THE DEPARTMENT, WITH MORE INFORMATION AT ITS DISPOSAL, MAY GET A DIFFERENT ANSWER TO YOU.

 
   
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